Right to die? Or slippery slope? Watch my take on euthanasia:

Right to die? Or slippery slope?

Watch my take on euthanasia:


'We Have Lost Our Respect for Life' on Euthanasia
www.voicesofliberty.com
January 26, 2015—Hello everybody and thank you for tuning in. Today I would like to talk a little bit about a very delicate subject, and that is euthanasia. It's legal in some states of our country; it's not legal in California but they'd like to make it legal and there's a big discussion going on.D…
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Bipartisanship in action

Last week, the US Senate voted on an amendment to the Keystone Energy bill that would create a new "Tenant Star" energy program. The Tenant Star program authorizes  the Department of Energy to develop "best practices" to improve energy [...]
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Education is Too Important Not to Leave to the Marketplace – Town Hall

This week, events around the country will highlight the importance of parental control of education as part of National School Choice Week. This year's events should attract more attention than prior years because of the growing rebellion against centralized education sparked by the federal Common Core curriculum. 

The movement against Common Core has the potential to change American education. However, anti-Common Core activists must not be misled by politicians promoting "reforms" of the federal education bureaucracy, or legislation ending Common Core while leaving all other federal education programs intact. The only way to protect American children from future Common Core-like programs is to permanently padlock the Department of Education. 

Federal programs providing taxpayer funds to public schools give politicians and bureaucrats leverage to impose federal mandates on schools. So as long as federal education programs exist, school children will be used as guinea pigs for federal bureaucrats who think they are capable of creating a curriculum suitable for every child in the country. 

Supporters of federal education mandates say they are necessary to hold schools "accountable." Of course schools should be accountable, but accountable to whom? 

Several studies, as well as common sense, show that greater parental control of education improves education quality. In contrast, bureaucratic control of education lowers education quality. Therefore, the key to improving education is to make schools accountable to parents, not bureaucrats. 

The key to restoring parental control is giving parents control of the education dollar. If parents control the education dollar, school officials will strive to meet the parents' demand that their children receive a quality education. If the federal government controls the education dollar, schools will bow to the demands of Congress and the Department of Education. 

So if Congress was serious about improving education it would shut down the Department of Education. It would also shut down all other unconstitutional bureaucracies, end our interventionist foreign policy, and reform monetary policy so parents would have the resources to provide their children with an education that fits their children's unique needs. Federal and state lawmakers must also repeal any laws that limit the education alternatives parents can choose for their children. The greater the options parents have and the greater the amount of control they exercise over education, the stronger the education system. 

These reforms would allow more parents access to education options such as private or religious schools, and also homeschooling. It would also expand the already growing market in homeschooling curriculums. I know a great deal about the homeschooling curriculum market, as I have my own homeschooling curriculum. The Ron Paul Curriculum provides students with a rigorous program of study in history, economics, mathematics, and the physical and natural sciences. It also provides intensive writing instruction and an opportunity for students to operate their own Internet businesses. Of course, my curriculum provides students with an introduction to the ideas of liberty, including Austrian economics. However, we do not sacrifice education quality for ideological indoctrination. 

It is no coincidence that as the federal role in education has increased the quality of our education system has declined. Any "reforms" to federal education programs will not fix the fundamental flaw in the centralized model of education. The only way to improve education is to shut down the Department of Education and restore control of education to those with the greatest ability and incentive to choose the type of education that best meets the needs of American children - American parents. 

For information about the Ron Paul Curriculum go to ronpaulcurriculum.com


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Governor Haslam FOR ObamaCare?

Tennessee became known as the Volunteer State because its people were willing to fight against big government statists to defend liberty at all costs. Now we need you to fight against Tennessee’s big government Governor Bill Haslam and his [...]
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Education is Too Important Not to Leave to the Marketplace

This week, events around the country will highlight the importance of parental control of education as part of National School Choice Week. This year’s events should attract more attention than prior years because of the growing rebellion [...]
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Campaign for Liberty


Ron Paul: Reform Is More Than Defeating “The Core” – FITSNews


Ron Paul: Reform Is More Than Defeating “The Core”
FITSNews
ron paul || By RON PAUL || This week, events around the country will highlight the importance of parental control of education as part of National School Choice Week. This year's events should attract more attention than prior years because of the ...

and more »

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Team Obama Supporting This?

A former adviser to the Obama campaign is behind the push for an Article V Convention. Yes, you heard that right. Lawrence Lessig, former adviser to the Obama campaign, is on the board of multiple efforts to call for a constitutional [...]
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Campaign for Liberty


Stop ObamaCare in Ohio!

The 2014 elections have thankfully come to an end. But what will happen to your liberty now that the newly elected are sworn in to office? Regardless of what the outcome was for the candidates in your area, you can most certainly count on [...]
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$217.6 Million Shortfall

$217.6 million. . . That’s how far the state’s Consensus Revenue Estimating Group had to reduce its general revenue estimates due to falling energy prices. And there’s no guarantee it won’t drop further. That means funding [...]
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Campaign for Liberty


My take on National School Choice Week in my weekly column: Education is Too Im…

My take on National School Choice Week in my weekly column: Education is Too Important Not to Leave to the Marketplace http://tinyurl.com/mffa7lc
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Ron Paul: Education Is Too Important Not To Leave To The Marketplace – OpEd – Eurasia Review

Ron Paul. Photo by David Carlyon, Wikipedia Commons

Ron Paul. Photo by David Carlyon, Wikipedia Commons

By

This week, events around the country will highlight the importance of parental control of education as part of National School Choice Week. This year’s events should attract more attention than prior years because of the growing rebellion against centralized education sparked by the federal Common Core curriculum.

The movement against Common Core has the potential to change American education. However, anti-Common Core activists must not be misled by politicians promoting “reforms” of the federal education bureaucracy, or legislation ending Common Core while leaving all other federal education programs intact. The only way to protect American children from future Common Core-like programs is to permanently padlock the Department of Education.

Federal programs providing taxpayer funds to public schools give politicians and bureaucrats leverage to impose federal mandates on schools. So as long as federal education programs exist, school children will be used as guinea pigs for federal bureaucrats who think they are capable of creating a curriculum suitable for every child in the country.

Supporters of federal education mandates say they are necessary to hold schools “accountable.” Of course schools should be accountable, but accountable to whom?

Several studies, as well as common sense, show that greater parental control of education improves education quality. In contrast, bureaucratic control of education lowers education quality. Therefore, the key to improving education is to make schools accountable to parents, not bureaucrats.

The key to restoring parental control is giving parents control of the education dollar. If parents control the education dollar, school officials will strive to meet the parents’ demand that their children receive a quality education. If the federal government controls the education dollar, schools will bow to the demands of Congress and the Department of Education.

So if Congress was serious about improving education it would shut down the Department of Education. It would also shut down all other unconstitutional bureaucracies, end our interventionist foreign policy, and reform monetary policy so parents would have the resources to provide their children with an education that fits their children’s unique needs. Federal and state lawmakers must also repeal any laws that limit the education alternatives parents can choose for their children. The greater the options parents have and the greater the amount of control they exercise over education, the stronger the education system.

These reforms would allow more parents access to education options such as private or religious schools, and also homeschooling. It would also expand the already growing market in homeschooling curriculums. I know a great deal about the homeschooling curriculum market, as I have my own homeschooling curriculum. The Ron Paul Curriculum provides students with a rigorous program of study in history, economics, mathematics, and the physical and natural sciences. It also provides intensive writing instruction and an opportunity for students to operate their own Internet businesses. Of course, my curriculum provides students with an introduction to the ideas of liberty, including Austrian economics. However, we do not sacrifice education quality for ideological indoctrination.

It is no coincidence that as the federal role in education has increased the quality of our education system has declined. Any “reforms” to federal education programs will not fix the fundamental flaw in the centralized model of education. The only way to improve education is to shut down the Department of Education and restore control of education to those with the greatest ability and incentive to choose the type of education that best meets the needs of American children — American parents.

For information about the Ron Paul Curriculum go to ronpaulcurriculum.com.

This article was published by RonPaul Institute.

Ron Paul

Ronald Ernest "Ron" Paul (born August 20, 1935) is an American physician, author, and politician who served as the U.S. Representative for Texas's 14th congressional district, which includes Galveston. He was a three-time candidate for President of the United States, as a Libertarian in 1988 and as a Republican in 2008 and 2012.

Source: Ron Paul Institute for Peace and Prosperity.


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Slandering Ron Paul – Antiwar.com

In the midst of his polemic against Ron Paul and the concept of "blowback" as the progenitor of Islamist terrorism, Kevin D. Williamson, writing in National Review Online, avers I’m "an intelligent man" – but after reading his jeremiad, I’m not sure I can return the compliment.

He urges his readers to consider my "cracked analysis" of the Paris attacks and proceeds to quote a single sentence out of a 2,000-word essay published on Antiwar.com:

"None of the individual terrorists who struck that fateful day would’ve even been in the country but for the fact that France established an African empire in the 19th century."

Omitted from this terse citation is my account of the history of French imperialism in Africa from the nineteenth century to the mid-1950s, a history that includes France’s outright annexation of its North African colonies – and the conferring of French citizenship on the conquered inhabitants. "Invade the world, invite the world" has always been the hallmark of European empires, a point understandably sensitive in a magazine filled with dire warnings about the "National Review‘s mission is to "stand athwart history yelling ‘Stop!’" surely he didn’t mean conservatives ought to stop paying attention to history. Is it really necessary to point this out to Buckley’s epigones?

"Blowback is about the apportionment of blame and opprobrium, and nothing more," declares Williamson, who claims I do "indeed want to blame the French – long-dead French – for the Paris attack."

Am I blaming the chefs of France? Its cheese-makers? Its cartoonists? That a leading writer for National Review must be instructed in the difference between a government and its long-suffering people is a sad commentary on the intellectual decline of contemporary conservatism, which has apparently abandoned methodological individualism, and elides the difference between the rulers and the ruled. The "slander" referred to in the title of Williamson’s piece is merely a case where the perpetrator projects his own crime onto the victim.

Blowback has little to do with "blame and opprobrium," i.e. moralistic posturing: it is merely the clear-headed expression of an idea that ought to be familiar to conservatives, succinctly summed up in Richard Weaver’s aphorism that "ideas have consequences." The idea of France’s "civilizing mission" in North Africa – the French version of the "white man’s burden" – did indeed have deadly consequences, and these continue to plague us all to the present day.

In his frenzy to evade this, Williamson takes his nihilistic denial of history to its ultimate absurd conclusion. To hear him tell it, I know "full well that there have been many other sources of Islamic immigration beyond European colonial projects, prominent among them Islamic colonial projects. If we’re going to go back to the 19th century in our blame game, why stop there? There wouldn’t have been any Muslims in Algeria for the French to conquer in the 19th century – or Muslims to be annoyed with us in Iran, or much of the rest of the world – if not for a fairly brutal campaign of conquest launched under the caliphate of Umar ibn Al-Khattāb. Hell, there wouldn’t be any Frenchmen in France if H. sap. hadn’t cruelly driven the Neanderthals to extinction."

If history is irrelevant, then the events of the seventh century are just as meaningless as those of the nineteenth, the twentieth, and an hour ago. That was then, this is now – the criminal nihilist’s perfect defense. Except that no jury would ever fall for it, unless it consisted of twelve clones of Kevin Williamson.

Williamson prefers not to hear of the war in Libya – now a terrorist nest — where France took the lead (while we paid the bills). Mention of French intervention against the Tuaregs of Mali, a former French colony, would also invite disdain. And as for those French jets dropping bombs in Iraq – cited by Amedy Coulibaly as motivating his murderous rampage – the whole matter is best left alone. The Williamsonian view is that the French campaign to reestablish its colonial empire under the guise of a "war on terrorism" has little to do with the Paris events. Yet one wonders: does he really believe what he is saying?

Which raises the question: what, exactly, is Williamson saying? At one point he — reluctantly –acknowledges that yes, of course, "

"Raimondo insists that Islamic militants would not be able to recruit violent jihadists ‘without pointing to Western intervention in the Middle East,’ which ignores the history of Islam in most of the world. India has a problem with Islamic extremism, and it’s not because Mohandas K. Gandhi wasn’t a nice enough guy."

Williams’s essentialist argument that Islam is per se violent, expansionist, and the embodiment of evil in the modern world here comes to the fore. It is the same argument made by those neoconservative theoreticians who characterized the Middle East is a "swamp" needing to be "drained" – and that this vast social engineering project could be carried out by American force of arms. The dominance of that worldview within the Bush administration led to the invasion, occupation, and ongoing break up of Iraq, and much of the region, just as critics of that war predicted. The neoconservatives who ceaseless agitated for war – notably in the pages of National Review – are directly responsible for the chaos presently overwhelming the Middle East. It is by no means an overstatement to credit Bill Kristol and his fellow neocons with fathering ISIS.

India’s Muslim "problem" is a red herring that Williamson just throws out there, hoping the sticky mass will adhere. It doesn’t. Rather than blaming Gandhi, it seems to me that the drawing of an arbitrary line by the British Foreign Office demarcating Muslim Pakistan from Hindu-dominated India had a bit more to do with it than Williamson is prepared to admit. But then again the status of Kashmir is not something he seems equipped to address.

National Review comes fairly late to the essentialism behind the idea that we must wage ceaseless war against "radical Islamic extremism." When the Kosovo war was in full swing, William F. Buckley, Jr., declaimed: “If I were voting on the Kosovo matter, I’d vote yes: Get on with the bombing.” In the cause of establishing a Muslim state in the midst of Europe, he called for “a saturation bombing along the fighting front, followed by a peacekeeping cordon of NATO soldiers.” And never mind the distinction between civilian and military targets:

“The one obstinately unsatisfactory aspect of the current analysis is the business of what we are determined not to do, which is to bomb other than the fighting front. The reasons we give are conventionally acceptable – you don’t endanger ‘innocent people.’ There are two difficulties with that formulation. One of them is that there really aren’t significant differences between civilian Serbs who are simply going about their duties in Belgrade, making shoes, or serving pasta, and other Serbs who are firing artillery into Kosovo villages.”

Bill Kristol’s Weekly Standard chimed in – or was it Buckley chiming in with Kristol taking the lead? – demanding that now is the time to "kick [Serb] skulls in," and declaring his impatience with Republican reluctance to go along with Clinton’s war. When Republican members of Congress voted to defund the Kosovo adventure, Kristol threatened to walk out of the GOP. The same useful idiots who signed all those Project for a New American Century "open letters" demanding a US invasion of the Middle East signed equally numerous public declarations of support for the Kosovar cause.

Yes, those were the good old days – when National Review and Osama bin Laden were on the same side!

The War Party changes its "principles" to suit the occasion – another manifestation of the nihilism that lies at the heart of its faux "conservative" veneer. They reject the lessons of history, even to the point of hoping we’ll forget their own history. Alas, some of us have long memories.

NOTES IN THE MARGIN

You can check out my Twitter feed by going here. But please note that my tweets are sometimes deliberately provocative, often made in jest, and largely consist of me thinking out loud.

I’ve written a couple of books, which you might want to peruse. Here is the link for buying the second edition of my 1993 book, Reclaiming the American Right: The Lost Legacy of the Conservative Movement, with an Introduction by Prof. George W. Carey, a Foreword by Patrick J. Buchanan, and critical essays by Scott Richert and David Gordon (ISI Books, 2008).

You can buy An Enemy of the State: The Life of Murray N. Rothbard (Prometheus Books, 2000), my biography of the great libertarian thinker, here.

Read more by Justin Raimondo


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Will Ron Paul’s Views Hurt Rand Paul’s Presidential Ambitions? – Newsmax.com


Will Ron Paul's Views Hurt Rand Paul's Presidential Ambitions?
Newsmax.com
The contrasts were sharp this weekend as Rand Paul attended a Koch brothers retreat in California in an effort to lure donors for an expected 2016 White House run. At the same time, Ron Paul was at a Houston hotel ballroom speaking at a conference on ...


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Daddy issues: Are Ron Paul’s hard-core stands a problem for son’s presidential … – Washington Post

By David A. Fahrenthold January 25 at 6:21 PM

HOUSTON — Rand Paul wants to lead the United States. On Saturday in Texas, his father was speaking at a conference about how to leave it.

“A lot of times people think secession, they paint it as an absolute negative,” said former representative Ron Paul (R-Tex.). After all, Paul said, the American Revolution was a kind of secession. “You mean we should have been obedient to the king forever? So it’s all in the way you look at it.”

This weekend was a crucial one for Rand Paul, the Republican senator from Kentucky and un­declared candidate for the presidency. He was in California, trying to line up donors at an opulent retreat organized by the billionaire Koch brothers.

At the same time, his father — retired after 12 terms in Congress and three presidential runs — was in the ballroom of an airport hotel here, the final speaker at “a one-day seminar in breaking away from the central state.” He followed a series of speakers who said that the U.S. economy and political establishment were tottering and that the best response might be for states, counties or even individuals to break away.

“The America we thought we knew, ladies and gentlemen, it’s a mirage. It’s a memory. It’s a foreign country,” Jeff Deist, Ron Paul’s former press secretary and chief of staff, told the group. “And that’s why we should take secession seriously.”

The contrasting scenes this weekend illuminate the odd situation of the Pauls as the 2016 campaign season begins. They are a father and son tied together — but running in opposite directions.

Rand, 52, is contemplating a presidential run — at its heart, an act of optimism. He is moderating some hard-line positions and introducing himself to donors and voters. At the same time, Ron, 79, has embraced a role as libertarianism’s prophet of doom, telling his supporters that the United States is headed for catastrophes — and might actually need catastrophes to get on the right track.

Which puts Rand Paul in the unusual position of trying to win over the country while his father says it is going down the tubes.

Asked by a reporter whether he was worried about making trouble for his son’s presidential campaign by talking about secession here, Ron Paul deflected the blame to the press: “If we had decent reporters, there would never be any problems. You think you could ever meet one? Have a heart, buddy.”

A spokesman for Rand Paul said he was not available to comment for this story. Both Pauls have said that if Rand Paul runs for president, his father will not campaign with him.

But supporters of the two men are concerned that Ron Paul’s continued activism will weigh on his son, even if they never appear onstage together. They worry that Rand Paul may have to repeatedly draw and re-draw the lines between his father’s views and his own.

“If I were Ron, and my son were running for president, and we were in the same situation, I would shut up,” said Walter Block, an economics professor at Loyola University in New Orleans. He rated Ron Paul a 98 on his personal scale of libertarianism and Rand Paul a 70, and said he supported them both.

“Ron is a millstone around Rand’s neck, in the sense that he’s not helping him — or, at least, he’s not helping him be Rand,” Block said. “Because Rand is a compromiser, and Ron and ‘compromise’ don’t belong in the same sentence.”

The two Pauls share many political positions. Both, for instance, have concerns about National Security Agency surveillance. But the son has called for reforming the agency’s practices, while the father wants to kill the NSA. Both Pauls are skeptical of overseas wars. But the father wants to pull all U.S. forces out of the Middle East, while the son has supported using U.S. warplanes to strike at the Islamic State, believing the group is a threat to American installations in the region.

The most important dif­ferences, however, are in the solutions they see to the nation’s problems.

Rand Paul’s solution is Rand Paul: a new president, with the right ideas and the guts to make the system work.

“All is not well in America. America is adrift. Something is clearly wrong,” Paul said in his downbeat response to President Obama’s upbeat State of the Union address last week. “America needs many things, but what America desperately needs is new leadership.”

Ron Paul’s solution, it appears, is to invite more calamity so that Americans are forced realize that the system is broken.

“Sanity will not return to U.S. leaders until our financial system collapses — an event for which they are feverishly working,” he wrote in an online column this month. The same column included predictions of greater inner-city strife, increased casualties among American armed forces overseas, and a dangerous escalation of tensions with Russia. “Before we can actually restore our liberties, we most likely will have to become a lot less free and much poorer,” he wrote.

Those opposing worldviews — one looking up, the other looking for rock bottom — have led the two Pauls to enunciate sharply different outlooks on American politics. Last year, for instance, the younger Paul campaigned for Republicans in 30 states before the midterm elections. On Election Day, his father said he didn’t expect much to change.

“We don’t have true democracy,” he told the Kremlin-based Russia Today network (although he said that his son was one of the forces for good in Washington). “We have a monopoly of ideas that are controlled by leaders of two parties, and though they call it two parties, it’s really one philosophy.”

And on Saturday, he came to Houston to talk about secession.

The event was organized by the Ludwig von Mises Institute, an Alabama-based think tank named after an Austrian economist whose writings are highly respected by libertarians. Ron Paul is a member of its board.

“We’ve been conquered. We’ve been occupied by the state, with its phony veneer of democratic elections,” Deist, the day’s first speaker, said, contending that the federal government has taken on powers the Founding Fathers never envisioned. He continued: “Why not seek out ways to split apart, rationally and nonviolently? Why dismiss secession, the rational alternative that’s staring us in the face?”

Other speakers offered a number of definitions for “secession.” They said individual states could break off, notwithstanding the experience in the Civil War (“Lincoln violated the Constitution” to keep the union together, one speaker said). States could even break off and join other countries, if they wanted.

“If Texas wanted to secede and join Mexico, I think they can do that. There’s nothing stopping them,” said Brion McLanahan, another speaker.

“I think Mexico is in many ways far freer than the United States,” Deist agreed.

But the speakers said that there were other ways to “secede,” beyond convincing your state to go it alone. Individual people could “secede” by doing such things as home-schooling their children, not going to mainstream colleges, owning gold and foreign currencies, and stockpiling food, fuel, firearms and cash (“seceding from dependency,” that was called).

In theory, speakers said, every American could just secede from the others, creating a nation where no one was subjugated to anyone else’s rule.

“What do we do for national defense?” someone in the audience asked.

“National defense is largely a myth. In other words, my fears for my family from Mr. Putin are far more remote than my fears of Mr. Obama and Mr. Boehner,” Deist said, meaning Russian President Vladimir Putin and House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio). He conceded there was one problem with this plan: “The thorn . . . is that nuclear weapons exist,” and somebody would have control over them, Deist said. “But secession is not perfection. It’s not utopia.”

Paul speech, the day’s last, was titled “Secession and Liberty,” but the focus was largely on the latter. Paul spent relatively little time on the mechanics or morality of secession, instead talking about the virtues of a smaller federal government and the ways in which big governments impose war on peace-loving people.

Paul’s son — the one headed to California — was mentioned only once onstage. “We have five children. There’s one involved, I think, in politics. I can’t remember his name . . .” he said, as the audience laughed.

Rand Paul will need to broaden his appeal far beyond his father’s hard-core supporters if he hopes to win the GOP nomination his father never could. But some members of that core said he was losing them by adopting policies closer to the GOP mainstream.

“He is the ‘Star Wars, Episode I,’ ” said Kent Ohler, 38, who records sound for TV and movies. He meant that the younger Paul was like the long-anticipated but largely disappointing sequel to the “Star Wars” movie franchise. “You have to like him to some degree, just because the name’s still stuck [on him]. But at the end of the day, he’s just not freakin’ right.”

Ohler and his younger brother Adam, sitting next to him, took the analogy further: Rand Paul’s endorsement of Republican Mitt Romney in the 2012 election was his “Jar Jar Binks” — comparing the Romney endorsement to the annoying alien that many “Star Wars” aficionados said made the “Phantom Menace” prequel irretrievably bad.

Chris Williams, 23, of Austin was at the same table, trying to find a way to make sense of the differences between father and son.

“Would it be so bad for one guy to totally fake and pretend, like a neocon, and then revert” to his true libertarianism? Williams asked.

“Like a libertarian ‘Manchurian Candidate’?” asked Kent Ohler.

“It’s dumb. It’s so many layers,” Williams said, realizing his idea wouldn’t work.

David A. Fahrenthold covers Congress for the Washington Post. He has been at the Post since 2000, and previously covered (in order) the D.C. police, New England, and the environment.


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Open letter to Ron Paul – WEBCommentary

Open letter to Ron PaulWEBCommentaryI have supported you going back to 1999. I would tell people about you and Austrian School economics a decade ago, only to be viewed as if everything the VA said about me was accurate. Many local staffers in Congress...
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Ron Paul on secession – WEBCommentary

Ron Paul on secessionWEBCommentaryLet me say that I never entertained the idea of not having a federal union, with a federal government, that the states belong to up until recently. One reason I have felt compelled to take this path is that I can see h...
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I think he’s onto something. The leaked documents back him up: http://bit.ly/1uE…

I think he’s onto something. The leaked documents back him up: http://bit.ly/1uE7kEm
#Snowden


Snowden: Surveillance Couldn't Prevent Paris Attack
www.voicesofliberty.com
January 22, 2015—International terrorist attacks keep proving NSA spying whistleblower Edward Snowden right. Snowden has said that agencies like the NSA are constantly throwing hay into a stack without ever...
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We have work to do here at home before dictating to other countries. Americans d…

We have work to do here at home before dictating to other countries. Americans deserve more choices: http://bit.ly/1z069jU
#Party #Politics


Libertarian, Other Parties Denied Top Ballot Spot by VA Court
www.voicesofliberty.com
January 22, 2015—The two major parties need not be referred to by name. But when Virginia's Libertarian Party and Robert Sarvis sued...
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Saudi Arabia’s government could change again soon. What comes next? http://bit….

Saudi Arabia’s government could change again soon.

What comes next? http://bit.ly/1xLNIcV #KingAbdullah


Saudi Arabia King Dead at 90, Sick 79 Year Old Takes Over
www.voicesofliberty.com
January 22, 2015—Saudi Arabia has a new king. Same as the old king?Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, who's 79 and ill, is taking over...
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Seems like good news. But let's be realistic: http://bit.ly/1yU9CAy

Seems like good news. But let's be realistic: http://bit.ly/1yU9CAy


IRS Budget Slashed; Expect Fewer Audits in 2015
www.voicesofliberty.com
January 20, 2015—Hello, everybody, and thank you for tuning in. I want to visit with you today about one of my least favorite organizations ever created, and that is the IRS. Of course, I've taken a very strong position on this for a long, long time. I made it very clear in the presidential campaign…
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